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Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

In the UK, Talk to Frank has been operating the anti-drugs campaign for a long time on its own. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

Ten years prior a police Swat group collided with a calm suburban kitchen and transformed the substance of medication education in the UK until the end of time. Grim warnings about how drugs could mess you up and genuine pleas to resist the pushers that were creeping around every playground were gone. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


In the main advertisement, an adolescent kid brings in a police grab squad to capture his mom when she recommends they have a tranquil chat about medications. But the new information being passed is: "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. It was intended to be a put stock in "elder brother" assumes that youngsters could swing to for advice concerning illegal substances. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


According to the creative director, Justin Tindall, of the advertising agency, Leo Burnett, it was important that Frank was at no time seen in the flesh so that he could never be the victim of ridicule for wearing the incorrect shoes or attempting to be "down with the kids". Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. Also, there's no sign that Frank is a government agent - something that is rare in the history of campaigns paid for by government.

Right from the days of Nancy Reagan, a lot has been done about drugs education, and the Grange Hill cast which a lot of people opine that it did more harm than good, simply encouraged people to "Just Say No" to drugs.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. But the scare tactics is still prevalent in majority of the campaigns against drugs around the globe, especially the "descent into hell" which is drug inspired. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

A study carried out in the UK on anti-drugs campaign that ran between 1999 and 2004 shows that adverts that portray the negative results of drug use influence vulnerable youth to try out with the drugs.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

According to the Home Office, 67% of younger people in a survey stated that they would ask Frank if they required advice on drugs. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

But, we don't have any proofs that people have quit drug consumption because of Frank, just as we don't have such evidence in cases of other media campaigns against drugs.

In the years since the campaign started, drug use in the UK is down by 9%; however, experts say this might be because marijuana use has declined, most like due to changing attitudes toward smoking tobacco.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. It is envisioned to lessen the utilization of both lawful and illicit medications by instructing youngsters as well as teenagers about the potential impacts of medications and liquor. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.


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Services

FRANK offers the following services for those who are looking for info and/or guidance regarding drugs:

  • The FRANK website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email help
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • A facility to find counselling besides management